Tennessee couple spots rare white deer in backyard – DIGIWIZ CENTRAL

Tennessee couple spots rare white deer in backyard

Albino deer “blue eyes” keeps her watchful eyes on her baby fawn at all times to make sure nothing happens to him.

Michael Crowley/Getty Images

A couple saw a rare white deer in their yard in Tennessee.The Tennessee Wildlife Resource Agency said one in 20,000 to 30,000 deer are albino.Hunting and killing albino deer is illegal in Tennessee and punishable by fine.

One couple in Tennessee says they spotted a very rare white deer in their backyard.

Abbey Cabler and her husband say they saw the deer outside their home in Spring Hill, Tennessee, in the early morning hours of October 24, according to WKRN, a local ABC affiliate.

“Sure enough there he is, just kind of like right on the other side of our porch, closer to the tree line just eating away on the bushes,” Cabler told the outlet.

In a Facebook post, Cabler said her family has named the deer Casper and plans to track it and ensure its safety.

The Tennessee Wildlife Resource Agency did not immediately return Insider’s request for comment, but the agency told WKRN that only one in every 20,000 to 30,000 deer have full albinism.

Some deer can also become “piebald,” a condition where animals are mostly white, but still have some patches of color, the agency said.

One of Cabler’s neighbors told the outlet that they had seen the deer last year with an injury to its leg. Cabler said the deer still has visible marks where the injury healed, and is now apparently “thriving.”

Hunting, killing, or trapping an “albino” deer is a crime in Tennessee, according to the TRWA. Tennessee law describes an “albino” deer as having “a lack, or significant deficiency, of pigment in the skin and hair, and pink eyes,” according to the agency. Violating the law is considered a misdemeanor and punishable by fines.

Read the original article on Business Insider
Please follow and like us:
Pin Share

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

RSS
Follow by Email
LinkedIn
Share