I drove gas and electric Mercedes sedans. Here’s how the two $140,000 cars stack up. – DIGIWIZ CENTRAL

I drove gas and electric Mercedes sedans. Here’s how the two $140,000 cars stack up.

The gas-powered Mercedes-Benz S-Class (top) and electric Mercedes-Benz EQS.

Tim Levin/Insider

I tested two fancy Mercedes sedans. One was gas-powered and one was an electric vehicle. Both were luxurious inside and buttery-smooth in motion. But there were some key differences between the S580e and EQS 580. 

An explosion in cool, new cars means that choosing between electric and gas-powered has never been tougher.

For example, Mercedes-Benz now sells the EQS, an electric equivalent to its top-dog S-Class sedan. I drove an EQS and an S-Class to see what’s different and similar between the two cars — besides the obvious.

The 2022 EQS I drove was the EQS 580 4MATIC, which in Mercedes-speak means it’s the more powerful model with all-wheel drive. The 2023 S-Class I tested was the S580e 4MATIC, meaning it was the all-wheel-drive plug-in hybrid model, which has an electric motor and a gas engine.

Both test cars Mercedes lent me had plenty of add-ons and cost around $140,000.

At a glance, it’s easy to tell the two cars apart.
The 2022 Mercedes-Benz EQS 580.

Tim Levin/Insider

The EQS looks simple, pure, and futuristic. It’s marked by smooth, flowing contours and very few edges.
The 2022 Mercedes-Benz EQS 580.

Tim Levin/Insider

The slippery design reduces drag and helps maximize range to between 340 and 350 miles, depending on the model.
The 2022 Mercedes-Benz EQS 580.

Tim Levin/Insider

The design language is shared across Benz’s new EQ sub-brand of electric vehicles, which also includes the EQS SUV, EQE sedan, EQE SUV, and EQB SUV.

The S-Class, on the other hand, has sharper features and a more conventionally stately appearance.
The 2023 Mercedes-Benz S580e.

Tim Levin/Insider

I think it’s the better looking car. But I’ll leave that up to you.
The 2023 Mercedes-Benz S580e luxury sedan.

Tim Levin/Insider

We also recently compared the Mercedes S-Class and Rolls-Royce Ghost to see the difference between standard luxury and a $400,000 vehicle.

Both had nice touches like door handles that pop out to greet you.
The 2023 Mercedes-Benz S580e.

Tim Levin/Insider

Let’s move on to the interiors. Both are sturdy, wonderfully comfortable, and made from stylish, high-end materials.
The 2023 Mercedes-Benz S580e.

Tim Levin/Insider

Remember, Mercedes offers lots of interior options. This is just what I experienced.

Both cars had plush leather seats, massage functions, big glass roofs, and tons of interior space.
The 2023 Mercedes-Benz S580e.

Tim Levin/Insider

But there still were some differences I noticed in both aesthetics and functionality.
The 2022 Mercedes-Benz EQS 580.

Tim Levin/Insider

The EQS’s cabin was full of swoopy curves — including turbine-style air vents — to match its exterior design.
The 2022 Mercedes-Benz EQS 580.

Tim Levin/Insider

The S580e has more straight lines and blocky features. Once again, the bold, weighty design mirrors the sort of vibes the S-Class gives off from the outside.
The 2023 Mercedes-Benz S580e.

Tim Levin/Insider

The EQS provides a tiny shelf under the center console since there’s no need for a solid transmission tunnel.
The 2022 Mercedes-Benz EQS 580.

Tim Levin/Insider

One of the big benefits of electric cars is that carmakers have extra interior space to play around with. Similarly, the Hyundai Ioniq 5 has a flat floor (no humps) and an open space between the front seats.

Plus, it was the first Benz to offer the optional Hyperscreen, a ginormous three-display setup.
The 2022 Mercedes-Benz EQS 580.

Tim Levin/Insider

Mercedes’ user interface is nice. And the Hyperscreen lends the EQS a high-tech vibe. But it’s total overkill.
The 2022 Mercedes-Benz EQS 580.

Tim Levin/Insider

Both back seats are large and soothing.
The 2023 Mercedes-Benz S580e.

Tim Levin/Insider

Check out all the most luxurious electric cars I’ve driven.

But the S-Class offers a bit more room.
The 2023 Mercedes-Benz S580e.

Tim Levin/Insider

The EQS trounces its gas-powered cousin when it comes to luggage space.
The 2022 Mercedes-Benz EQS 580.

Tim Levin/Insider

The EQS has a hatchback, while the S-Class has a regular trunk — and not a terribly large one at that.
The 2022 Mercedes-Benz EQS 580.

Tim Levin/Insider

And the S580e has way less luggage space than non-hybrid models, presumably because of the extra batteries.

How do both cars drive?
The 2023 Mercedes-Benz S580e.

Tim Levin/Insider

Both insulate you from the outside world like a nice pair of noise-canceling headphones.
The 2023 Mercedes-Benz S580e.

Tim Levin/Insider

And, thanks to their air suspensions, both do a superb job of smoothing out rough roads.
The 2023 Mercedes-Benz S580e.

Tim Levin/Insider

Neither was quite as tranquil as the Rolls-Royce Spectre EV, which I tested this summer.

Either can be equipped with rear-wheel steering that helps them maneuver around parking lots like cars half their size.
The 2022 Mercedes-Benz EQS 580.

Tim Levin/Insider

The EQS was just a bit quieter, smoother, and quicker off the line thanks to its electric powertrain.
The 2022 Mercedes-Benz EQS 580.

Tim Levin/Insider

Electric cars are inherently quicker than gas-powered ones, because their motors can provide full power at any speed.

Both sedans offer a laundry list of safety and driver-assistance features as standard, including Mercedes-Benz’s impressive advanced cruise control system.
The 2023 Mercedes-Benz S580e.

Tim Levin/Insider

Plug-in hybrids like the S580e are kind of like a halfway point between regular hybrids and fully electric cars. They have large-ish batteries that can be charged and typically offer decent electric-only range of 25-50 miles.

With their automated-driving features switched on, both cars were able to confidently hug highway curves and navigate stop-and-go traffic.
The 2023 Mercedes-Benz S580e.

Tim Levin/Insider

And for the 2024 model year, both cars will be available with Drive Pilot, the first system in the US that encourages drivers to read a book or watch YouTube while the car does all the work during highway traffic jams.
Mercedes Drive Pilot in the EQS.

Mercedes-Benz

Mercedes Drive Pilot is the first Level 3 autonomous driving system approved in the US. It’ll initially be available on certain highways in California and Nevada.

Read the original article on Business Insider
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