Mortgage Interest Rates Today, October 5, 2023 | Rates Keep Climbing. Here’s When They Might Come Down.

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Mortgage rates have skyrocketed this week, with 30-year mortgage rates now well above 7% for many borrowers.

In fact, according to myFICO, borrowers with credit scores between 620 and 639 will actually see an average APR around 8.678% on a $300,000 loan. But those with scores above 760 may be able to get a rate around 7.089%. This means that if you’re currently in the market for a mortgage, having a great credit score is more important than ever.

When will we finally get some relief from sky-high mortgage rates? Probably not until later next year, but we may start to see rates inch down in the coming weeks and months, depending on certain key economic indicators.

Keep an eye out for September’s jobs report release on Friday and the latest Consumer Price Index data next week. If the labor market shows signs of slowing and inflation cooled in September, we could see rates ease a bit. But regardless of how these economic reports turn out, hopeful homebuyers will likely need to wait until 2024 to see a substantial drop in mortgage rates.

Mortgage Rates Today

Mortgage Refinance Rates Today

Mortgage Calculator

Use our free mortgage calculator to see how today’s mortgage rates will affect your monthly and long-term payments.

By plugging in different term lengths and interest rates, you’ll see how your monthly payment could change.

30-Year Fixed Mortgage Rates

This week, the average 30-year fixed mortgage rate was 7.31%, according to Freddie Mac. This is a 12-basis-point increase from the week before, and the highest this rate has been since 2000.

The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage is the most common type of home loan. With this type of mortgage, you’ll pay back what you borrowed over 30 years, and your interest rate won’t change for the life of the loan.

The lengthy 30-year term allows you to spread out your payments over a long period of time, meaning you can keep your monthly payments lower and more manageable. The trade-off is that you’ll have a higher rate than you would with shorter terms or adjustable rates. 

15-Year Fixed Mortgage Rates

Average 15-year mortgage rates were 6.72% this week, according to Freddie Mac data. This is an 18-basis-point increase from the previous week, and the highest this rate has been since 2001.

If you want the predictability that comes with a fixed rate but are looking to spend less on interest over the life of your loan, a 15-year fixed-rate mortgage might be a good fit for you. Because these terms are shorter and have lower rates than 30-year fixed-rate mortgages, you could potentially save tens of thousands of dollars in interest. However, you’ll have a higher monthly payment than you would with a longer term.

Are Mortgage Rates Going Up?

Mortgage rates started ticking up from historic lows in the second half of 2021 and increased significantly in 2022. But mortgage rates are expected to trend down this year.

In the last 12 months, the Consumer Price Index rose by 3.7%. As inflation comes down, mortgage rates should, too. But we’ll likely need to see price growth slow further before we see substantial drops in rates.

For homeowners looking to leverage their home’s value to cover a big purchase — such as a home renovation — a home equity line of credit (HELOC) may be a good option while we wait for mortgage rates to ease. Check out some of our best HELOC lenders to start your search for the right loan for you.

A HELOC is a line of credit that lets you borrow against the equity in your home. It works similarly to a credit card in that you borrow what you need rather than getting the full amount you’re borrowing in a lump sum. It also lets you tap into the money you have in your home without replacing your entire mortgage, like you’d do with a cash-out refinance.

Current HELOC rates are relatively low compared to other loan options, including credit cards and personal loans. 

How Do Fed Rate Hikes Affect Mortgages?

The Fed has been increasing the federal funds rate to try to slow economic growth and get inflation under control.

Mortgage rates aren’t directly impacted by changes to the federal funds rate, but they often trend up or down ahead of Fed policy moves. This is because mortgage rates change based on investor demand for mortgage-backed securities, and this demand is often impacted by how investors expect Fed hikes to affect the broader economy. 

As inflation comes down, mortgage rates should, too. But the Fed has indicated that it’s watching for sustained signs of slowing inflation, and it’s not going to lower rates again any time soon.

Read the original article on Business Insider

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